• 21-22INT03

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ora
    Te Ao Māori

    Name: Dr Matiu Rātima

    Institution: The University of Canterbury

    Project Title: Tūrou Hawaiki: Morning karakia and waiata as a culturally responsive pedagogy

    Project location: Canterbury University Campus Rehua building (with flexible work from home arrangements)

  • 21-22INT07

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ora
    Te Ao Māori

    Project supervisors: Mr Tama Blackburn and Miss Sera Gibson

    Institution: Taranaki Mounga Project Limited (TMPL)

    Project Title: Te Au Roa – Predator sound lure trial: Draw possums out of those difficult to reach places on Taranaki Mounga

    Project location: New Plymouth - The intern could be located anywhere in Taranaki as most things are only a drive away but preferably, they would be located in the New Plymouth area.

  • 21-22INT10

    Internship project Pae Tawhiti project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Mauri

    Project supervisor: Associate Professor Anne-Marie Jackson

    Institution: The University of Otago

    Project location: The University of Otago, Dunedin Campus

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed

    This summer internship was organised by Dr. Te Taka Keegan to be a Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Named Internship supervised by Dr. Kim Pickering at The University of Waikato. The project was called “He Tohu Maumahara ki a Paora Mato” and involved the creation of a 3D printed Tekoteko with a harakeke based biodegradable filament for a trophy in memory of Paora Mato, a staff member at The University of Waikato who unfortunately passed away last year in June.

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    This report has been prepared for Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga as part of the summer internship programme 2018-2019. This project is titled Tangaroa Ara Rau: Whānau connections and Water Safety with a purpose to understand unique whānau connections to water and its benefit for water safety.

    Throughout the summer of 2018 Terina Raureti (Ngāti Raukawa) was given the opportunity to work alongside the waka club Hauteruruku ki Puketeraki and their Tūmai Ora initiative which focused on engaging rangatahi with their pepeha through waka.

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    This research report has been titled Rākau-nui as an acknowledgement to the full moon phase in the Maramataka (Māori lunar calendar). Rākau-nui also represents the collected journey to which this full report has been constructed from. The Maramataka is
    a repository of ancient and traditional knowledge orally handed down throughout the generations by our forebears to ensure the sustainability of a healthy environment and thus healthy people (Tawhai, 2013).

    The Maramataka is a system of phases which allow Māori to construct ways to interact with the environment.

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Intern: Hana Skerrett-White

    Supervisor: Professor Angus Hikairo Macfarlane

    University of Canterbury

     

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Intern: Jonothan Rau

    Supervisor: Dr Shaun Awatere

    Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga/Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research

    This research project seeks to identify horticultural land use opportunities in Māori-owned Wairoa, Te Tairawhiti rohe. The outcomes of this project are to monitor and assess current soil and water trends to determine the most suitable crops for preventing wind and water erosion. Methods include district scale spatial analysis (Reid et. al 2006) to determine the most suitable crops, of which are saffron, feijoa and gevuina.

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Intern: Te Okahurangi Ngahana-Hartley

    Supervisor: Drs Rangi Matamua and Hēmi Whaanga

    The University of Waikato

     

  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Intern: Rewi Nankivell

    Supervisor: Dr Carla Houkamau

    The University of Auckland Business School

    This research seeks to determine the concepts of cultural richness through a Māori lens and within the principles of whanaungatanga, manaakitanga and aroha. Nankivell blends personal narrative and research to examine cultural richness and social capital and how these themes can be integrated into an urban setting.

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