• Full project Internship project

    Project commenced:

    The purpose of this proposal is for interns to: - experience the ethos of the Māori & Psychology Research Unit and a culture of research excellence; - enhance their knowledge of indigenous psychology; the process of indigenising psychology; and the task of energising an indigenous Māori psychology. - engage with the research cycle and be active in generating research ideas and proposals for funding. Interns will be located on campus at the Māori & Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikato and will:

    Liberating Psychologies_Maori Moving Forward_HJones.pdf
    Liberating Psychologies_Maori Moving Forward.pdf
  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Ōkahu Bay lies adjacent to Te Whenua Rangatira, occupying a dominant headland near the mouth of the Waitemata Harbour, collectively the ancestral home of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei. The spiritual significance of the land was recognised by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei ancestors who sought to safeguard Te Whenua Rangatira as a place which links water, land, forest and sky (Tangaroa, Papatūānuku, Tānemahuta and Ranginui) maintaining a strong link with surrounding cultural landmarks within the isthmus and beyond.

    14INT08 - NPM Report- Okahu Bay - Peter van Kampen .pdf
  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    The purpose of this project is to examine the Māori and Pacific archives in the Hocken Library pertaining to Tangaroa, the ocean and the sea. The intern will undertake archival research specifically within the Hocken Library and this will form part of the initial stages of the Māori programme of research within the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge.

    14INT06 - Tangaroa Ara Rau Ngahuia Mita 2015.pdf
  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    A survey study conducted in 2012 investigated whether employee perceptions of the extent to which their organisation espoused 5 core Māori values identified in the literature (manaakitanga, wairuatanga, auahatanga, whakawhanaungatanga, and kaitiakitanga), influenced their disposition to engage in helping behaviours at work and feel more committed to the organisation. These relationships were moderated by extent of identification with Māori culture (being Māori vs. identifying as Māori).

    14INT05 - Monograph Internship UC.pdf
  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    Can communicative language teaching (CLT) help save indigenous languages? This project is a review of literature on CLT and its relevance to indigenous language revitalisation. It forms part of a broader research project to examine the teaching and learning of Māori, Tahitian and Hawai’ian within universities.

    14INT02 - COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING Internship Report.pdf
  • Internship project

    Project commenced:

    This internship project involves preliminary research for a book proposal on "Māori Law Stories". The book will aim to tell the stories behind a number of historical and contemporary legal cases involving Māori. This is in the tradition of the field of "legal archaeology" - digging up the forgotten or untold aspects of legal cases - who the people were, the reasons for bringing a case, and what happened afterwards.

  • 21-22INT04

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ahurei
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Project Supervisor: Dr Gianna Leoni

    Partner: Te Hiku Media

    Project Summary: Papa Reo is a multilingual language research platform grounded in indigenous knowledge and ways of thinking and powered by cutting edge data science. Te Reo Irirangi o Te Hiku o Te Ika (Te Hiku Media) have been trusted gatherers and kaitiaki of te reo Māori data for over 30 years. The overall objective of the summer internship was to investigate the linguistic features of te reo Māori in tautohetohe, formal debates, broadcast in the mid 1990s.

  • 21-22INT12

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ahurei
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Project Summary: The Whakarauora Research Project aims to re-integrate traditional fishing methods used by Whanganui tūpuna into the development of an education curriculum and through facilitating wānanga. Wānanga have been facilitated for a tamariki and rangatahi environmental group, called Te Morehu Whenua, who have been established under the auspices of hapū associated with Rānana Marae, Whanganui. As a case study, Te Morehu Whenua examine taonga species within the Whanganui River area, which include tuna, kākahi, kōura, atutahi and pātiki.

  • 21-22INT06

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Tawhiti
    Pātai Whānau

    Project supervisor: Dr Waikaremoana Waitoki

    Institution: The University of Waikato

    Project Summary: The primary purpose of this project is to explore how selected issues involving race in New Zealand are framed and discussed in social and traditional media, including expression of both overt and more subtle forms of racism.

  • 21-22INT01

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ahurei
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Project Supervisors: Morgan Tupaea and Dr. Rāwiri Tinirau

    Institution: Te Atawhai o Te Ao: Independent Māori Research Institute for Environment and Health

    Project Summary: The Whakapapa Research Project aims to gather whānau narratives from eight whānau case studies. As this project unfolds, whānau responses to challenges they have experienced will be documented, and a whānau research methodology will be developed. Through this project, an innovative space of whānau narratives and whakapapa connections will be created, and provide insight into the organisation, perseverance, and preservation of whānau and whakapapa over time.

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