Our Research

NPM research solves real world challenges facing Māori. We do so in Māori-determined and inspired ways engendering sustainable relationships that grow the mana (respect and regard) and mauri (life essence) of the world we inhabit.

The excellence and expertise of the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga researcher network is organised by four Te Ao Māori knowledge and excellence clusters or Pae. Pae are where our researchers rise with Te Ao Māori knowledge, tools and expertise to build a secure and prosperous future for Māori and Aotearoa New Zealand. Pae are purposefully expansive and inclusive, supporting transdisciplinary teams and approaches. Our 2021-2024 programme of work will look to the far future to assure flourishing Māori futures for generations to come. With Māori intended as the primary beneficiaries of our research, our programme will reinforce the firmly established foundations of mātauranga Māori through sound research attuned to the lived experience of Māori.

Four Pātai or critical systems-oriented questions generate transformative interventions and policy advice for stakeholders and next users. All of our research will contribute mātauranga-informed theories, models and evidenced solutions in response to our Pātai. Our Pātai serve to integrate and energise our programme and Pae to synthesize our research for next stage impact and outcomes.

  • 22PHD11

    Doctoral Thesis

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Tawhiti
    Pātai Mauri

    PhD Candidate: Ms Emily Bain (Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga, Ngāti Toarangatira)

    Primary Supervisor(s): Dr. Esther Willing

    It is well established that there are significant problems in Aotearoa New Zealand’s health and disability system, especially for Māori – largely due to the cultural differences between Māori and the biomedical system the New Zealand health system was modelled on.

  • 22PHD09

    Doctoral Thesis

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    PhD Candidate: Mana Mitchell (Ngāti Maniapoto)

    Primary Supervisor(s): Dr Esther Willing

  • 21-22INT10

    Internship project Pae Tawhiti project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pātai Mauri

    Project supervisor: Associate Professor Anne-Marie Jackson

    Institution: The University of Otago

    Project location: The University of Otago, Dunedin Campus

  • 21-22INT06

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Tawhiti
    Pātai Whānau

    Project supervisor: Dr Waikaremoana Waitoki

    Institution: The University of Waikato

    Project Summary: The primary purpose of this project is to explore how selected issues involving race in New Zealand are framed and discussed in social and traditional media, including expression of both overt and more subtle forms of racism.

  • 21-22INT04

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ahurei
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Project Supervisor: Dr Gianna Leoni

    Partner: Te Hiku Media

    Project Summary: Papa Reo is a multilingual language research platform grounded in indigenous knowledge and ways of thinking and powered by cutting edge data science. Te Reo Irirangi o Te Hiku o Te Ika (Te Hiku Media) have been trusted gatherers and kaitiaki of te reo Māori data for over 30 years. The overall objective of the summer internship was to investigate the linguistic features of te reo Māori in tautohetohe, formal debates, broadcast in the mid 1990s.

  • 21-22INT07

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ora
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Project supervisors: Mr Tama Blackburn and Miss Sera Gibson

    Institution: Taranaki Mounga Project Limited (TMPL)

    Project Title: Te Au Roa – Predator sound lure trial: Draw possums out of those difficult to reach places on Taranaki Mounga

    Project location: New Plymouth - The intern could be located anywhere in Taranaki as most things are only a drive away but preferably, they would be located in the New Plymouth area.

  • 21-22INT03

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ora
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Name: Dr Matiu Rātima

    Institution: The University of Canterbury

    Project Title: Tūrou Hawaiki: Morning karakia and waiata as a culturally responsive pedagogy

    Project location: Canterbury University Campus Rehua building (with flexible work from home arrangements)

  • 21-22INT01
    Project commenced:
    Project completed

    Project Supervisor: Dr Robin Quigg

    Institution: The University of Otago

  • 21-22INT01

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ahurei
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Project Supervisors: Morgan Tupaea and Dr. Rāwiri Tinirau

    Institution: Te Atawhai o Te Ao: Independent Māori Research Institute for Environment and Health

    Project Summary: The Whakapapa Research Project aims to gather whānau narratives from eight whānau case studies. As this project unfolds, whānau responses to challenges they have experienced will be documented, and a whānau research methodology will be developed. Through this project, an innovative space of whānau narratives and whakapapa connections will be created, and provide insight into the organisation, perseverance, and preservation of whānau and whakapapa over time.

  • 21-22INT12

    Internship project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    Pae Ahurei
    Pātai Te Ao Māori

    Project Summary: The Whakarauora Research Project aims to re-integrate traditional fishing methods used by Whanganui tūpuna into the development of an education curriculum and through facilitating wānanga. Wānanga have been facilitated for a tamariki and rangatahi environmental group, called Te Morehu Whenua, who have been established under the auspices of hapū associated with Rānana Marae, Whanganui. As a case study, Te Morehu Whenua examine taonga species within the Whanganui River area, which include tuna, kākahi, kōura, atutahi and pātiki.

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