Professor Tracey McIntosh

Tūhoe
Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga / University of Auckland

Tracey McIntosh (Ngāi Tūhoe) is Professor of Indigenous Studies and Co-Head of Te Wānanga o Waipapa at the University of Auckland. She previously taught in the sociology and criminology programme at the University of Auckland. Tracey brings a high level of experience to her roles in international work, community development, student equity and in her wider contributions to the academic community. Tracey has lectured at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji, was a Fulbright Visiting Lecturer in New Zealand Studies at Georgetown University in Washington D.C.

Soon after separating Ranginui and Papatūānuku, Tāne travelled into the heavens with the various celestial bodies, to suspend them in the sky bringing light unto the world. Within the basket ‘Te Mangoroa’ Tāne carried the stars, from which he drew forth the brightest and placed them against the chest of Ranginui. So enthralled was Tāne at what he had achieved that he accidently knocked the basket over scattering the remaining stars across the cosmos. As the stars spilled from the basket they clattered against one and other creating a ringing sound that resonated throughout the universe.

The announcement of $5 million per annum to maintain a Māori Centre of Research Excellence (CoRE) as of January 2016 will ensure the important, distinctive and multifaceted research that will serve the interests of Māori and New Zealand.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) was delighted to receive the news confirming that Māori research has been valued and recognized by New Zealand’s government and that there is now permanent funding that will be secured through a contestable bidding process that will enable Māori research to expand.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM), New Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence, publically released its 2013 Annual Report. The report highlights the significant outputs, contributions and outcomes NPM produce for a mere $5.3 million of Centre of Research Excellence funding from the Tertiary Education Commission.

Among these significant contributions, NPM:
• Research produced
o a model of Māori educational success factors,
o an online decision-making tool for sustainable practice and development,
o identified critical elements and key success factors for childrearing,

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